Suffrage

The 2008 World Economic Forum Gender Gap Report places the United States 27th in overall gender equality. Our country is placed on a pedestal, at least in our own eyes, when considering rank in global leadership positions. Reality displays a country that has not taken all actions to realize gender equality and the end to discrimination. One step is easy enough. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) is an international treaty that addresses a woman’s right to education, to vote, to own property, and to seek protection under the law from violent domestic abuse. Ratifying CEDAW results in the astounding.  The United States seems to be all right with placing 27th,with failing to take this easy step for human rights.

Kuwait approved CEDAW in 1994. This is a nation enveloped by Islamic Law, and we see the twisting of Islam here to horrifyingly deprive women of their rights. Why would such a place ratify a treaty that fights for the end of repressing half the world’s population? Kuwait failed for years to take action according to CEDAW, so the CEDAW committee, which reviews the progress of ratifying countries, urgently advised Kuwait to adopt new legislation. On May 16, 2005, Parliament extended political rights to women. This includes the right to vote and to run for office.

Kuwait is still a country plagued by problems, but the ability to solve those issues has been enhanced, as women are now allowed to partake in political society. One may argue corruption eliminates any actual success from women being able to vote. But success is found in the declared realization by the heads of Kuwait that women are just as capable at making political decisions. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women strengthened the voice of the women of Kuwait. Ratifying CEDAW results in the astounding. Your voice is easily heard, if used. Ask your Senators to support the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.